Predicting the unknown and the unknowable. Are anthropometric measures and fitness profile associated with the outcome of a simulated crossfit® competition?

Javier Peña, Daniel Moreno-Doutres, Iván Peña, Iván Chulvi-Medrano, Alberto Ortegón, Joan Aguilera-Castells, Bernat Buscà

    Research output: Indexed journal article Articlepeer-review

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The main objective of this research was to find associations between the outcome of a simulated CrossFit® competition, anthropometric measures, and standardized fitness tests. Ten experienced male CrossFit® athletes (age 28.8 ± 3.5 years; height 175 ± 10.0 cm; weight 80.3 ± 12.5 kg) participated in a simulated CrossFit® competition with three benchmark workouts (“Fran”, “Isabel”, and “Kelly”) and underwent fitness tests. Participants were tested for anthropometric measures, sit and reach, squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), and Reactive Strength Index (RSI), and the load (LOAD) corresponding to the highest mean power value (POWER) in the snatch, bench press, and back squat exercises was determined using incremental tests. A biva-riate correlation test and k-means cluster analysis to group individuals as either high-performance (HI) or low performance (LO) via Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were carried out. Pear-son’s correlation coefficient two-tailed test showed that the only variable correlated with the final score was the snatch LOAD (p < 0.05). Six performance variables (SJ, CMJ, RSI, snatch LOAD, bench press LOAD, and back squat LOAD) explained 74.72% of the variance in a k= 2 means cluster model. When CrossFit® performance groups HI and LO were compared to each other, t-test revealed no difference at a p ≤ 0.05 level. Snatch maximum power LOAD and the combination of six physical fitness tests partially explained the outcome of a simulated CrossFit competition. Coaches and practitioners can use these findings to achieve a better fit of the practices and workouts designed for their athletes.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number3692
    JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
    Volume18
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2021

    Keywords

    • Athlete
    • Cross-training
    • Functional fitness
    • High-intensity functional training
    • Performance

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