The role of cultural orientation in bargaining under incomplete information: Differences in causal attributions

Ana Valenzuela, Joydeep Srivastava, Seonsu Lee

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Resum

This research examines how differences in cultural orientation influence causal attributions and thus the behavioral outcomes in an incomplete information bargaining situation. Using ultimatum bargaining, three experiments demonstrate that acceptance rates differ across Western and East Asian cultures because of the differences in implicit theories of behavior. The results of Experiment 1 shows that East Asians are more sensitive to both external constraints and group influences but only when there is information about the opponent's situation to discount personality traits. Experiment 2 shows that reasons for an opponent's behavior mediate the influence of cultural orientation on bargaining outcomes when situational constraints are made salient. Experiment 3 shows that reasons for an opponent's behavior based on the saliency of a group context mediate the influence of cultural orientation on behavior. The paper concludes by discussing the implications of the findings and suggesting directions for future research.

Idioma originalAnglès
Pàgines (de-a)72-88
Nombre de pàgines17
RevistaOrganizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes
Volum96
Número1
DOIs
Estat de la publicacióPublicada - de gen. 2005
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