The interplay between aging-associated loss of protein homeostasis and extracellular vesicles in neurodegeneration

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Resum

The finding of an effective cure or treatment for neurodegenerative diseases is one of the biggest challenges for this century. Although these diseases show different clinical manifestations, the presence of toxic protein aggregates in the brain of patients is a common feature to all of them, suggesting a loss of protein homeostasis. Aging, the primary risk factor for the majority of neurodegenerative disorders, is linked to the impairment of degradative compartments such as lysosomes and autophagosomes. Besides, many genetic factors for Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, or frontotemporal dementia, as examples of frequent neurodegenerative diseases, are causative of endo-lysosomal and autophagosomal dysfunctions. There is scientific evidence suggesting that neurons can counteract the accumulation of undegraded cellular material by the secretion of extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are vesicles with a size ranging from 50 to 100 nm generated in a type of endosomal compartment named multivesicular body. EVs play a crucial role in removing cellular waste, promoting protein aggregation, and spreading toxic protein aggregates in the brain of patients. In this review, the interplay between the impairment of degradative compartments, the secretion of EVs, and their pathological/beneficial role in neurodegeneration is described.

Idioma originalAnglès
Pàgines (de-a)262-283
Nombre de pàgines22
RevistaJournal of Neuroscience Research
Volum98
Número2
DOIs
Estat de la publicacióPublicada - 1 de febr. 2020
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