Binding moral values gain importance in the presence of close others

Daniel A. Yudkin, Ana P. Gantman, Wilhelm Hofmann, Jordi Quoidbach

Producció científica: Article en revista indexadaArticleAvaluat per experts

17 Cites (Scopus)

Resum

A key function of morality is to regulate social behavior. Research suggests moral values may be divided into two types: binding values, which govern behavior in groups, and individualizing values, which promote personal rights and freedoms. Because people tend to mentally activate concepts in situations in which they may prove useful, the importance they afford moral values may vary according to whom they are with in the moment. In particular, because binding values help regulate communal behavior, people may afford these values more importance when in the presence of close (versus distant) others. Five studies test and support this hypothesis. First, we use a custom smartphone application to repeatedly record participants’ (n = 1166) current social context and the importance they afforded moral values. Results show people rate moral values as more important when in the presence of close others, and this effect is stronger for binding than individualizing values—an effect that replicates in a large preregistered online sample (n = 2016). A lab study (n = 390) and two preregistered online experiments (n = 580 and n = 752) provide convergent evidence that people afford binding, but not individualizing, values more importance when in the real or imagined presence of close others. Our results suggest people selectively activate different moral values according to the demands of the situation, and show how the mere presence of others can affect moral thinking.

Idioma originalAnglès
Número d’article2718
RevistaNature Communications
Volum12
Número1
DOIs
Estat de la publicacióPublicada - 1 de des. 2021

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