A Nested Case–Control Study of Metabolically Defined Body Size Phenotypes and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

Neil Murphy, Amanda J. Cross, Mustapha Abubakar, Mazda Jenab, Krasimira Aleksandrova, Marie Christine Boutron-Ruault, Laure Dossus, Antoine Racine, Tilman Kühn, Verena A. Katzke, Anne Tjønneland, Kristina E.N. Petersen, Kim Overvad, J. Ramón Quirós, Paula Jakszyn, Esther Molina-Montes, Miren Dorronsoro, José María Huerta, Aurelio Barricarte, Kay Tee KhawNick Wareham, Ruth C. Travis, Antonia Trichopoulou, Pagona Lagiou, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Giovanna Masala, Vittorio Krogh, Rosario Tumino, Paolo Vineis, Salvatore Panico, H. Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Peter D. Siersema, Petra H. Peeters, Bodil Ohlsson, Ulrika Ericson, Richard Palmqvist, Hanna Nyström, Elisabete Weiderpass, Guri Skeie, Heinz Freisling, So Yeon Kong, Kostas Tsilidis, David C. Muller, Elio Riboli, Marc J. Gunter

Producció científica: Article en revista indexadaArticleAvaluat per experts

70 Cites (Scopus)

Resum

Background: Obesity is positively associated with colorectal cancer. Recently, body size subtypes categorised by the prevalence of hyperinsulinaemia have been defined, and metabolically healthy overweight/obese individuals (without hyperinsulinaemia) have been suggested to be at lower risk of cardiovascular disease than their metabolically unhealthy (hyperinsulinaemic) overweight/obese counterparts. Whether similarly variable relationships exist for metabolically defined body size phenotypes and colorectal cancer risk is unknown. Methods and Findings: The association of metabolically defined body size phenotypes with colorectal cancer was investigated in a case–control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Metabolic health/body size phenotypes were defined according to hyperinsulinaemia status using serum concentrations of C-peptide, a marker of insulin secretion. A total of 737 incident colorectal cancer cases and 737 matched controls were divided into tertiles based on the distribution of C-peptide concentration amongst the control population, and participants were classified as metabolically healthy if below the first tertile of C-peptide and metabolically unhealthy if above the first tertile. These metabolic health definitions were then combined with body mass index (BMI) measurements to create four metabolic health/body size phenotype categories: (1) metabolically healthy/normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2), (2) metabolically healthy/overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2), (3) metabolically unhealthy/normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2), and (4) metabolically unhealthy/overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2). Additionally, in separate models, waist circumference measurements (using the International Diabetes Federation cut-points [≥80 cm for women and ≥94 cm for men]) were used (instead of BMI) to create the four metabolic health/body size phenotype categories. Statistical tests used in the analysis were all two-sided, and a p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. In multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression models with BMI used to define adiposity, compared with metabolically healthy/normal weight individuals, we observed a higher colorectal cancer risk among metabolically unhealthy/normal weight (odds ratio [OR] = 1.59, 95% CI 1.10–2.28) and metabolically unhealthy/overweight (OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.01–1.94) participants, but not among metabolically healthy/overweight individuals (OR = 0.96, 95% CI 0.65–1.42). Among the overweight individuals, lower colorectal cancer risk was observed for metabolically healthy/overweight individuals compared with metabolically unhealthy/overweight individuals (OR = 0.69, 95% CI 0.49–0.96). These associations were generally consistent when waist circumference was used as the measure of adiposity. To our knowledge, there is no universally accepted clinical definition for using C-peptide level as an indication of hyperinsulinaemia. Therefore, a possible limitation of our analysis was that the classification of individuals as being hyperinsulinaemic—based on their C-peptide level—was arbitrary. However, when we used quartiles or the median of C-peptide, instead of tertiles, as the cut-point of hyperinsulinaemia, a similar pattern of associations was observed. Conclusions: These results support the idea that individuals with the metabolically healthy/overweight phenotype (with normal insulin levels) are at lower colorectal cancer risk than those with hyperinsulinaemia. The combination of anthropometric measures with metabolic parameters, such as C-peptide, may be useful for defining strata of the population at greater risk of colorectal cancer.

Idioma originalAnglès
Número d’articlee1001988
RevistaPLoS Medicine
Volum13
Número4
DOIs
Estat de la publicacióPublicada - d’abr. 2016
Publicat externament

Fingerprint

Navegar pels temes de recerca de 'A Nested Case–Control Study of Metabolically Defined Body Size Phenotypes and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)'. Junts formen un fingerprint únic.

Com citar-ho